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What can the organisation achieve with a digital Quality Management System?

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on March 7 2019

A digital quality management system contributes to the quality and safety of a healthcare institution. By automating processes, productivity increases. Tasks and responsibilities (relating to for example analysis and follow-up of incidents) are clear, as such matters are laid down in the quality management system.

When the effectiveness and safety are improved, the institution’s customer service also improves. Assessments of reported incidents and complaints make clear which parts of the customer service can be improved.

When purchasing the software it is advisable to assess the needs of the organisation. A proper baseline measurement shows where the organisation stands today, and what is required to improve the current situation.

This blog describes a number of pillars that allow us to measure to what extent quality and safety are permanent items on management’s agenda.

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Participation: How to give patients/clients a voice?

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on February 7 2019

Patients/clients must have full confidence in safe and good quality care. Healthcare professionals therefore do everything in their power to avoid unnecessary damage or unnecessary risks for patients/clients. Still, occasionally things go wrong. Unconsciously or unintentionally...

When talking about unsafe care, in general we think of incidents or risky situations. However, for patients/clients many more situations occur that may be unsafe. Inadequate communication, unfair treatment or a bad atmosphere are all factors that may evoke feelings of insecurity. 

By actively listening to experiences of patients/clients and their relatives the quality and safety of care can be substantially improved, without requiring major change processes. But how do you give patients/clients a voice?

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What is the purpose of a Quality Management System?

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on January 10 2019

The quality management system forms part of an institution’s overall management system and aims to improve patient safety, and hence the quality of care. Many healthcare institutions choose to digitally process quality indicators, in order to monitor them effectively. However, when purchasing a digital quality management system, it is important to understand why the organisation needs such a system.

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The role of patients/clients and their relatives in improving healthcare

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on November 20 2018
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Digital Quality Management System, a nice-to-have or necessity?

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on October 23 2018

What is meant by a quality management system?

Quality Management System, a nice-to-have or necessity? To answer this question we first need to make clear what we understand by a quality management system. The quality management system forms part of an institution’s overall management system and aims to improve patient safety, and hence the quality of care. This should ultimately lead to a maximum reduction of preventable errors in healthcare.

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What is the connection between informed consent and patient/client participation?

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on September 25 2018

This blog describes the essence of patient participation and shows you that informed consent in an important form of patient participation. 

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Topics: Communication, Incident Management, Informed consent, Incident reporting, Quality management software, Patient participation, Participation ladder, Patient focused care, Quality of care

To be and remain a good care professional

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on June 5 2018

Organisational culture determines the behaviour of medical specialists. The reverse also holds true. The way in which doctors deal with quality and safety – and call one another to order regarding behaviour and incident reporting – determines to a large degree the culture of a healthcare institution. This is due to the position held and example shown by the medical specialist within a healthcare institution.

This blog describes the causes and effects of dysfunctional behaviour by medical specialists and how an open culture reduces the risk of this behaviour.

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Topics: Culture

Care professionals, the second victim of a medical incident

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on May 15 2018

Whether it’s a tough conversation with only bad news or patients who are nearing the end and eventually pass away, care professionals are regularly confronted with the emotions of patients and their nearest and dearest. They have developed considerable experience with respect to how to handle emotion – and are accustomed to doing so. That is however not the case if the emotional cause can be attributed to a mistake made by themselves. Care professionals experience feelings of anxiety, uncertainty, shame and even loneliness. Naturally, the patients are the first victims of a medical incident, but the care professionals involved are victims too, the so-called second victims.

This blog describes the interventions that can be applied to support the care professionals involved. Most important is creating a healthcare safety culture, where people can talk openly about incidents.

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Topics: Culture, Incident Management

What can the aviation industry teach us about safety in the healthcare sector?

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on April 3 2018

“In the airline business, there are six avoidable deaths for every 10 million flights. In the healthcare sector, it appears that there are six avoidable deaths for every 10 thousand hospital admissions.”

In bygone decades, the airline business has invested time and energy to focus on the “soft side” of safety in addition to the “hard side”. This blog describes what the healthcare industry can learn from the aviation business in the field of safety. 

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Topics: Culture

From blaming & shaming to a learning organisation

Posted by Bianca Beentjes on March 1 2018

We all know that incident reporting is not the moment for reproach. It is a learning opportunity for care professionals involved as well as for their colleagues. The question is; how do you create an open culture without “blaming and shaming” and improve safety levels within your care institution? Read this blog to see “which buttons you can press” to create safety awareness in your team.

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Topics: Cultuur

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